Pick the right pants

Erick Olland from City Park Runners shows features to look for in winter running pants. It’s still cold out there, folks!

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What goes on at a winter marathon?

Finally the Hypothermic Half Marathon is complete and I’m very excited to share my experience with you! With so many winter runners in one place at one time, I learned so much just on the day of my marathon.

How did I do? Well I finished and I am ecstatic about that. It was the slowest time I’ve clocked to date on a half marathon, but that was the least of my worries for this race. I didn’t even wear a watch. I am proud of myself for pushing myself to try something new. And perhaps the only thing harder than running the 13 miles on the -16 plus wind-chill day was weekly long runs in weather even worse than that as I trained. It is not an easy task and merely completing it feels great.

So what’s a winter marathon like anyhow? Well it ain’t no run in the park (ha). You know that feeling you get at a race as people start to gather at the starting line, they wait for the gun shot, and Chariots of Fire or some other comparable classic is blasted and hoards of runners slowly funnel through the arch of the start? Well none of that happened because we were obviously hiding indoors trying to avoid the cold weather until the last possible second. I froze my fingers trying to take a few pictures before the race. That was comforting given I was wearing gloves at the time. Not.

Just minutes before we were ushered to the starting line, we were gathered indoors, zipping up our battle gear and lathering our faces with Vaseline. I was fumbling around with my iPod trying to find where the cord should fit between my many layers of clothes. A woman standing next to me saw me wrap my iPod in a Kleenex before I put it in my pocket. I do this so it won’t freeze from being damp; it works occasionally. She pulled a toe warmer out of her pocket and offered it to me, you know the disposable ones that heat up your boots for hours? It stuck right to the back of my iPod and kept it running the whole race. I thanked her kindly as she showed me that they came two in a pack and attached one to her own mp3 player. What a great tip!

Another cool tip which I caught on camera was that many of the runners were Duct taping their shoes before the race. I shouldn’t have been so surprised, we’re Canadian eh? Well the reason I’ve never written about taping your shoes is because I’ve never really had a problem with cold feet. Even my runners with mesh keep my feet warm, so it’s not something I ever considered. But after running the race it appeared that there were more people taping their shoes than there were people wearing grips so I guess this is the real deal. I will likely follow up on this topic in a future blog post. But I can tell you now that as I ran through the snow, I was dodging fallen Duct tape wads every odd pace. I wonder how well it works if it doesn’t appear to stay on.

I really didn’t face any major challenges during the race that were winter related. Sure, the water at the water stations was a bit frozen. And, yes, it was a dread wearing as much clothes as I was. But overall, the biggest challenge I had was simply keeping focused on putting one foot in front of the other. Near mile 11 I got to the point where I was jogging so slow that I was spending more energy bouncing up and down than I was moving forward. My power walking was more efficient at this point, so I took some breaks. My iPod playlist ran out so I wound up listening to an old running playlist and found myself running to a variety of seasonal hits such as Summer Nights by Rascall Flatts. I was so cold at this point that the irony irritated me. But I pressed on.

The finish line in this particular race was anti-climactic. I had no idea when it was coming, as it was hidden around a bend in thick trees. I knew I was close, but that last mile feels like a marathon in itself, so it’s hard to judge. Anyway, I slowly turned a corner and poof, there was the finish line. I didn’t even have time to pick up speed and pretend I was running that fast the whole way for the cheering spectators. I’m a firm believer in a strong finish. But nevertheless, I was greeted at the finish line with high fives from volunteers and a shiny medal placed on my neck. For me, that’s what this was all about and I couldn’t have asked for anything more.

Now that I mention that, a HUGE shout out to all the volunteers who handed out water and marshaled us in the right direction. The only thing worse than running around in the cold is just standing there for hours as three waves of runners passed through. You couldn’t see me smiling at you through my balaclava when you cheered for me, but I sure do appreciate all who helped out.

Finally, I was very impressed with the hot brunch served after the race. I stuffed myself with french toast, hot chocolate, bacon, sausages, and dozens of fresh breads and salads. This was a lovely treat and much more appropriate than a post-race Popsicle after such a cold morning.

Despite this wonderful experience, I can’t say at this point that I’m keen on running this race next year. However, I am so thrilled that I am in the shape I’m in now so that I carry on my training for a spring run or two.

Thank you to everyone who followed my journey, your support encouraged me push through and I am ever grateful. You rock!