Pick the right pants

Erick Olland from City Park Runners shows features to look for in winter running pants. It’s still cold out there, folks!

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My shoes, my story

If my shoes could talk, surely they’d have a lot to say. I have been running (willingly) for about 7 years. Being 22, that’s nearly a third of my life. And in this life I have only relied on only two pairs of running shoes.

Pair #1

I can’t even remember the brand of this pair. They were the product of a back-to-school shopping list that required students to buy a pair of running shoes with white soles to not mark the floor of the gymnasium. My mother purchased me the finest pair that Zellers can buy, size eight, with shiny silver racing stripes. They were a decent shoe and they lasted me years, being used relatively gently. My feet didn’t grow past middle school, so there was never a need to replace them. The spring I signed up for my first half marathon, I trained in these shoes. I was in no-way prepared to run a marathon at this point, I was just trying to get into shape. About a month before the race, I had only worked up to about 10 kilometres in training—very very bad. So as I kicked my training into rapid high gear in these shoes, I realized that they were not built for long distance running (quelle surprise) so I developed a fairly bad case of ITBS in my left leg. I decided that it was a bad idea to purchase new shoes so close to a race without breaking them in, so I ran and finished my first half marathon in cheap, ugly, department store shoes and was crippled with ITBS for weeks. Not to mention all the blisters I had to bandage halfway through the race. Which brings me to introduce you to shoes number 2.

Pair #2

In line with my bargain hunting ways, I found my next pair of running shoes at Costco. This was approximately 8 months after my crap-shoe-fandango and I was itching to get back running again. There they were, next to a free sample station of trail mix: my white and blue, reasonably priced Adidas. These shoes gave me no pain ever. There was no break-in time. They were absolutely the best investment ever because to this day they still feel great. There really isn’t much more to say about these shoes, they were great from the minute I tried them on. They got me through a much more successful half marathon, a handful of 10 ks and even a winter half marathon. These are the ol’ reliables that I have no reason to replace until they break or wear out.

And that’s it. Just the two. So as you can see, it’s not very often I let a new pair of running shoes into my life. But yesterday I was feeling adventurous.

It all started when I visited Vancouver a few weeks ago. I spent many days walking the streets of downtown Vancouver in sensible walking shoes (not my running shoes.) I couldn’t help but notice that everybody seemed to be dressed as though they were going to the gym. More specifically, every second woman was stomping the streets in Lululemon tights and pink Nikes. If they weren’t wearing those exact brands, they had damn close knockoffs. And seeing these outfits sitting on the sky train, picking up a coffee or dining on a late lunch made it quite clear that all of these women were, in fact, not on their way to the gym. It seems as though this city, who does way more walking than Winnipeg, has found a way to make their walking lifestyle practical and trendy. Because everyone wants to dress the exact same, right? Right.

Winnipeg isn’t quite there yet. We embraced the yoga pant craze with open arms years ago. But from my understanding of prairie fashion conventions, tights with riding boots equals day wear and tights with runners means I’m on my way to the gym. The rules are rarely broken.

However there’s a twist. I walked through one of Winnipeg’s finest shopping malls the other day and found every athletic store chocked full of pink Nikes and various other fluorescent running shoes. It’s still, like, minus a billion here, but it won’t be for long. So even though I’m not seeing my fellow Winnipegers walking down Portage Avenue in pink Nikes yet, we could be not far off. Only time will tell if our city slowly embraces the style of our western Canadian friends, or if the fluorescent shoes are kept strictly for workouts.

Well whatever happens, I am ready to join right in. Because I have just purchased my third ever pair of running shoes in an exhilarating shade of fluorescent purple and lime green.

snazzy.

snazzy.

For me it’s not just for the fashion. Other runners likely know how motivating it can be to purchase a new piece of gear and hit the streets to test it out. My new shoes make me excited to run, and I love that. But I’ll only wear them every odd jog because I don’t want my old running shoes to feel like they’re being replaced. Not. Possible.

If your shoes could talk, what do you think they’d have to say?

How Cold Is Too Cold??

Winnipeg Willow the groundhog didn’t see her shadow this Groundhog Day, but so far it’s not looking good for an early spring.

According to http://globalnews.ca:                                                                                                                 

“The coldest February since 1979 is ending with all of the province except the Churchill region under Environment Canada wind chill warnings. Dangerous wind chills of -45 to -50 are expected across southern Manitoba, the federal weather agency said. In northern Manitoba, the wind chill could drop as low as -55.”

HAVEN’T WE SUFFERED ENOUGH???

Well first I’d like to say that I am extremely thankful that when I ran the Hypothermic Half marathon last weekend it was only -16. If I woke up race day to -50 degree winds, I really don’t know if I could do it.

I’ve written before about how to protect yourself from the bitter cold (view post). But at some point you really have to know when it’s just too dangerous to run outside. In the winter I run in small circuits near my house so that I’m never far from safety. But if you enjoy something more scenic or the beauty and challenge of trails, it can be very dangerous to run when the weather gets too cold. Imagine twisting an ankle or realizing you’re underdressed miles away from home.

An article by Kelly O’Mara on http://running.competitor.com says:

“Research suggests that as long as it’s warmer than -18 degrees, it’s not too cold to work out — as long as you take the appropriate precautions.”

O’Mara explains that running in weather any colder than -18 puts runners at high risk of frostbite. But -18? That’s a few degrees away from wearing only windbreakers and shoveling the walk in shorts up in Winnipeg. Ok, I’m exaggerating a little.

Everyone is different and every city is different. As a born-and-raised Winnipeger, I’m comfortable running outdoors up to about -30, though I don’t enjoy it.

At what point do you stay inside? I am interested to see how Winnipegers and non-Winnipegers differ.